Integration Guide

This guide will teach you how to integrate your gem, framework, or other Ruby project with the honeybadger Ruby gem.

Who Is This Guide For?

This guide is for anyone who is interested in extending the capability of the Honeybadger gem in order to share their integration with the Honeybadger community. In addition to covering how to create your integration, you'll learn two ways to package and distribute it:

  1. Submit a pull-request (PR) to the official Honeybadger gem
  2. Publish your integration as a new gem that you maintain

What Can I Build?

Honeybadger's plugin system integrates with popular gems (and even Ruby itself) in order to report exceptions with rich contextual information. Here are some examples of plugins which have been created so far:

Getting Started

The Honeybadger gem has a plugin system which allows you to step into our initialization process. From there, you can use the full power of Ruby to integrate with Honeybadger in interesting ways.

Honeybager's plugin API is simple—there are only a few methods you need to learn. To give you an idea of what this looks like, let's build a simple plugin.

Building Your Plugin

Imagine you're using a framework which provides the following API for handling exceptions:

MyFramework.on_exception do |exception|
  # Exception handling code (report the exception, log it, etc.)
end

This is a fairly common pattern; for instance, SuckerPunch has a similar API.

Here's a Honeybadger plugin which checks to see if MyFramework is available. If it is, it installs an exception handler which reports all exceptions to Honeybadger:

require 'honeybadger/plugin'
require 'honeybadger/ruby'

module Honeybadger
  module Plugins
    # Register your plugin with an optional name. If the name (such as
    # "my_framework") is not provided, Honeybadger will try to infer the name
    # from the current file.
    Plugin.register 'my_framework' do
      requirement do
        # Check to see if the thing you're integrating with is loaded. Return true
        # if it is, or false if it isn't. An exception in this block is equivalent
        # to returning false. Multiple requirement blocks are supported.
        defined?(MyFramework)
      end

      execution do
        # Write your integration. This code will be executed only if all requirement
        # blocks return true. An exception in this block will disable the plugin.
        # Multiple execution blocks are supported.
        MyFramework.on_exception do |exception|
          Honeybadger.notify(exception)
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

There are three steps which Honeybadger performs when loading your plugin:

  1. Honeybadger::Plugin.register registers the plugin with Honeybadger.
  2. When initializing an application, Honeybadger will attempt to load your plugin, executing every requirement block you gave it.
  3. If all requirement blocks returned true, then Honeybadger executes each execution block in turn.

A Simple Sidekiq Plugin

Sidekiq is a good example of a framework which integrates nicely with Honeybadger, providing a lot of rich contextual data with each exception.

Note: Keep in mind that we already support Sidekiq natively, so don't try to actually run this example in a Honeybadger project, or you may get multiple exception reports. :)

# lib/honeybadger/plugins/sidekiq.rb

require 'honeybadger/plugin'
require 'honeybadger/ruby'

module Honeybadger
  module Plugins
    # It's best practice to create your own Honeybadger::Plugins::YourFramework
    # namespace, if you need to create additional classes to use when executing
    # your plugin.
    module Sidekiq
      class Middleware
        def call(worker, msg, queue)
          Honeybadger.context.clear!
          yield
        end
      end

      Plugin.register do
        requirement { defined?(::Sidekiq) }

        execution do
          ::Sidekiq.configure_server do |sidekiq|
            sidekiq.server_middleware do |chain|
              chain.prepend Middleware
            end

            sidekiq.error_handlers << lambda {|ex, params|
              job = params[:job]
              Honeybadger.notify(ex, {
                parameters: params,
                component: job['wrapped'] || job['class']
              })
            }
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

Sharing Your Plugin

Once you've built your plugin, it's time to share it with other 'badgers like you, for fame and glory (or at least a high-five). There are two good ways to share a plugin:

  1. Submit a PR to the Honeybadger gem
  2. Publish your own Ruby gem, such as "honeybadger-plugins-sidekiq"

We'd love to help you decide which of these is the best way to go. We're very open to including a wide variety of plugins in the official Honeybadger gem, so that everyone can enjoy them by default. Head over to GitHub and tell us about your plugin by creating a new issue.

Here's an example issue (this is just how I'd write it—you don't need to include a link to your plugin if you haven't finished it yet, or it isn't on GitHub).

Hey 'badgers!

I use Sidekiq a lot in my daily work, and since there is no existing Honeybadger integration, I decided to make one. Would you be interested in including Sidekiq as a default plugin?

Here's a link to Sidekiq:

https://github.com/mperham/sidekiq

Here's a link to my plugin:

https://github.com/joshuap/honeybadger-plugins-sidekiq

Thanks!

We'll get back to you as soon as possible. If we decide that your plugin is something that would benefit everyone, we'll ask you to submit a PR (if you aren't sure how to do this, don't worry—read on for instructions, and feel free to ask us for help!

If we decided against a PR for some reason, you can publish your plugin as a gem, which is another great way to share it with the community.

Submitting a PR

To submit a PR, you'll need a few things:

  1. A GitHub account
  2. Git and a supported Ruby version installed on your computer
  3. A fork of the honeybadger gem repository

After creating a fork (go to the honeybadger-ruby repository and use the Fork button, top-right of the page), run the following commands to set up your local copy of the gem:

git clone https://github.com/your-username/honeybadger-ruby.git
cd honeybadger-ruby
bundle install

To make sure everything is set up correctly, try running the unit tests:

bundle exec rake spec:units

You should see something like this:

All examples were filtered out; ignoring {:focus=>true}

Randomized with seed 14664
................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Finished in 0.97639 seconds (files took 0.57739 seconds to load)
512 examples, 0 failures

Assuming the tests ran, you should be ready to add your plugin code.

  1. Create a file in lib/honeybadger/plugins/. The file name should use snake_case, and have a Ruby (.rb) file extension. If your plugin integrates with "MyFramework", then the file path should be lib/honeybadger/plugins/my_framework.rb.

  2. Add your plugin code to the file you created.

  3. A good PR should include tests. We use RSpec for our test suite. For an example of a simple RSpec plugin test, check out the tests for the SuckerPunch plugin.

Use bundle exec rake spec:units to run the tests while developing your plugin. After adding some tests and/or verifying that your plugin doesn't cause issues with Honeybadger, you're ready to submit your plugin:

  1. Add an entry to CHANGELOG.md:

    ## [Unreleased]
    ### Added
    - Added a plugin for MyFramework
    

    See Keep a Changelog for more info on the format of the changelog.

  2. Commit your changes:

    git add .
    git commit --message "Add a MyFramework plugin."
    
  3. Push your changes:

    git push origin master
    

Now that your fork has the changes you want to add, create a pull request to the honeybadger-io/honeybadger-ruby repository on GitHub. If you're not sure how to create a pull request, check out GitHub's guide, and feel free to ask us for help!

Publishing Your Own Gem

Before publishing your own gem, read through the official RubyGems guide. Here are some basic steps to create a gem and publish it to RubyGems.org. If you get stuck, feel free to ask us for help!

Fun fact: did you know that Ruby Central uses Honeybadger to monitor RubyGems.org for exceptions?

Creating the Gem

Bundler has a handy tool that will create a simple gem for you.

  1. Make sure you have the bundler gem installed:

    gem install bundler
    
  2. Create a new gem using the bundle gem command. You should name your gem "honeybadger-plugins-[name of your plugin]". For example, if your plugin integrates with MyFramework, name your project: "honeybadger-my_framework":

    bundle gem honeybadger-plugins-my_framework
    

    Follow the prompts to add tests (we use RSpec), create a license (we like MIT), and add a code of conduct for your gem.

  3. Once your gem is created, check out the directory structure, and read the README:

    cd honeybadger-my_framework
    ls -l
    cat README.md
    
  4. Lastly, run the bundle install command:

    bundle install
    

    It will fail the first time, asking you to edit the honeybadger-plugins-my_framework.gemspec file. Make the requested edits and then re-run bundle install until it completes successfully.

Note: If you added a test framework, run the new test suite with bundle exec rake.

Adding Your Code

  1. Add your plugin code to lib/honeybadger/plugins/my_framework.rb, which should have been created by the bundle gem command.

  2. If you chose to add a test framework when creating your gem, add some tests.

  3. After you verify that your plugin works, commit your changes:

    git add .
    git commit --message "Add a MyFramework plugin."
    

Pushing To RubyGems.org

To publish your first version (0.1.0) to RubyGems.org:

gem build honeybadger-plugins-my_framework.gemspec
gem push honeybadger-plugins-my_framework-0.1.0.gem

You can view your new gem at the following URL:

https://rubygems.org/gems/honeybadger-plugins-my_framework